DANCEMAKERS PRESENTS

LARA KRAMER’S

MIIJIN KI, A NEW WORK-IN-PROGRESS

Lara Kramers Miijin ki - Aria Evants and Brian Solomon  - by Omer YukSeker.jpg
Miijin Ki sees four bodies navigating colonial values of ownership of land. A woman twirls endlessly cashing her trails of pleasure, while another rebuilds beauty among the fall and collapse of her storm. - Lara Kramer

Choreography

Lara Kramer

With collaborators

Aria Evans, Ana Groppler, Patti Shaughnessy, & Brian Solomon

Lighting Design

Oz Weaver

DATES

Wednesday, January 23 & Thursday, January 24 | 8 pm

LOCATION

Dancemakers Centre for Creation, 9 Trinity Street, Theatre Studio 313, Toronto's Distillery Historic District

TICKETS

$15 Arts Workers/Seniors/Students & $20 General

Purchase tickets on line here - No service charges!

On sale on-line until 3PM day of performance and then at the Door - box office opens at 7:15 pm

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ABOUT LARA KRAMER

Lara Kramer is of mixed Oji-Cree and settler heritage, and a choreographer and performer whose work is intimately linked to her memory and Aboriginal roots. She received her BFA in Contemporary Dance at Concordia University, Mon­treal (2008). Working with strong visuals and narrative, her work pushes the strength and fragility of the human spirit. Lara’s work is political and potent, often examining political issues surrounding Canada and First Nations Peoples. She has been recognized as a Human Rights Advo­cate through the Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre.

Said The Globe and Mail, “Kramer is an aboriginal choreographer, but her works have universal resonance…  [she] is a talent to watch. She wears her heart on her sleeve, which translates into dance theatre that is as vulnerable as it is emotional.”

Lara’s works have included NGS (Native Girl Syndrome) (2013) which was met with critical acclaim across the country; her solo work Tame (2015) which she showed in its very nascent stage at Native Earth’s 2015 Weesageechak Begins to Dance Annual Festival of Indigenous Works; and, most recently, Windigo which was performed at Festival TransAmériques, Montréal in May 2018.


Image: Aria Evans & Brian Solomon Photo: Omer Yukseker